• image coming soon

 

 

 

Name:

Very Small Ancient Lapis, Agate, Turquoise, and Carnelian Beads with Gold and Agate Bow Bead Center


Collection:

Agate


Material:

Agate, Carnelian, Lapis Lazuli, Turquoise, 22k gold


Size:

The necklace is 21 inches (54.6 cm) in length. The necklace weighs 12.5 gm.


Price:

$6,250.00


 

 

Description

 

A necklace of turquoise, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and agate beads alternating with 20k gold cylinder beads. There is a bow shaped agate bead at the midpoint of the necklace. There are twenty-two small carnelian barrel beads, twenty lapis lazuli barrel beads and ten small agate barrel beads. Each of the stone beads alternates with a 22k gold cylinder bead. The pair of small turquoise disc beads that face the center bow bead are each faced with a pair of granulated ring beads composed of six granules arranged in a circlet. The bow bead is 1.8 cm in length, 7 mm in height and 5 mm in thickness. The drill hole diameter is 1mm. The turquoise disc beads are 2 mm in length, 3.5 mm in width The drill hole diameter is slightly less than 1 mm. The small carnelian barrel beads are 3.5 mm in length and 3.2 mm in width with drill hole diameters of 1 mm. The lapis tube beads are 6-9 mm in length and 2.5 3.5 mm in width. The drill hole diameters are 1mm. The agate barrel beads are 3-5 mm in length and 3mm in width. The longer tapered tubes have drill holes of 1 mm; the shorter more cylindrical ones have drill hole diameters of 1.5mm. The carnelian cylindrical beads have straight sides and are 5.5 mm in length, 3 mm in width and have drill holes of 1.5 mm. The idea of alternating gold beads with an equal number of barrel-shaped beads made of a variety of colored stones comes from our appreciation of the jewelry of Susa in the Achaemenid Period (4th century B.C.). Susa (biblical Shushan) lay at the edge of the Iranian plateau, not far from the great cities of Mesopotamia. It absorbed both Addadian and Babylonian influences principally through booty from conquests in Mesopotamia. Treasures from the royal city of Susa can be viewed in the Louvre.